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    John T. Dorwin

    Professor
    Isle Hall 133B
    Phone: 509.359.4215
    Fax: 509.359.4215
    Email: john.dorwin@ewu.edu
    Curriculum Vitae

    Dr. John T. Dorwin received his Ph.D. from Indiana University with a dissertation on late prehistoric archaeological cultures of central Indiana. After teaching for six years in Kentucky and North Carolina he formed a Cultural Resource Management firm and for fourteen years directed terrestrial and underwater archaeological and historical investigations under contract to state and federal agencies as well as corporate clients. He returned to teaching in 1990, specializing in underwater archaeology and principles of historical and anthropological archaeology.

    Courses: ANTH 101 Cultural Anthropology; ANTH 452 Underwater Archaeology; ANTH 355 Indians of North America; ANTH 301 Principles of Archaeology

    Jerry R. Galm

    Professor
    Isle Hall 105
    Phone: 509.359.2477
    Fax: 509.359.2477
    Email: jgalm@ewu.edu
    Curriculum Vitae

    Dr. Jerry R. Galm received his B.A. degree from Michigan State University and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Washington State University. His dissertation research focused on Archaic (Wister) and Early Woodland (Fourche Maline) archaeological cultural developments in eastern Oklahoma. Following stops at the University of Oklahoma and the University of West Florida he accepted a position at Eastern in 1981. Dr. Galm spent many years in applied research in addition to teaching and has specialized in lithic technology and the prehistory of the Pacific Northwest since 1981. His previous research includes a coastal erosion study in West Africa as well as archaeological studies throughout the Pacific Northwest. Dr. Galm also traveled to South Kazakhstan State University in Shymkent, Kazakhstan, during the winter of 2007-2008 on a Fulbright Grant.

    Courses: ANTH 101 Cultural Anthropology; ANTH 457 World Archaeology; ANTH 342 Tribes, Bands, and Chiefdoms; ANTH 347 Peoples of Africa; ANTH 358 Medical Anthropology, ANTH 355 Indians of North America; ANTH 450 Cultural Ecology

    Sarah Keller

    Program Director
    Isle Hall 107
    Phone: 509.359.7039
    Fax: 509.359.7039
    Email: skeller@ewu.edu
    Curriculum Vitae

    Dr. Sarah Keller received her Ph.D. from Harvard University with a dissertation on subsistence adaptations to fluctuating climatic conditions on the northwestern Great Plains from 7000 to 1500 years ago. She has taught at EWU since 1966 when she first started the anthropology program. Her archaeological field work has taken her to Guatemala, Canada, France, and England with a joint summer undergraduate field opportunity for students in England. In the US she has worked in the Great Plains, Northwest, and the Southwest. For the last 20 years she has focused on physical and forensic anthropology and now works as a forensic consultant for various Inland Northwest law enforcement agencies. She is also Chair of the Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects Research (IRB). Her eclectic research interests are in issues of research integrity and conduct, human subjects rights and a long term project on river flooding of the Yellow River (China), the Mississippi (U.S.) and other geologically analogous rivers. In 2009, she received the Trustees' Medal Award.

    Courses: ANTH 101 Cultural Anthropology; ANTH 345 Physical Anthropology; ANTH439 Human Evolution;  ANTH439 Primates; ANTH439 Human Variation ANTH 460 Forensic Anthropology

    Robert Sauders

    Professor
    Isle Hall 109
    Phone: 509.359.7904
    Email: rsauders@ewu.edu

    Robert R. Sauders is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Geography and Anthropology and the Department of History at Eastern Washington University where his teaching focuses on the Middle East, Islam, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, transnational activism, peace-building and geographic information systems (GIS).

    Dr. Sauders’ research explores the practical and theoretical complexities surrounding the direct and indirect participation of activists and networks in transnational social justice and human rights campaigns with a particular interest in how such actors can shape and influence conceptualizations and constructions of space and place within ethnic, national, religious, political, economic and environmental conflicts.

    Specifically, the focus of this research is on non-state actors who engage the political discourse from grassroots, social justice frameworks that cut across traditional ethnic, national and religious boundaries and, instead, emphasizes transnational spatial understandings rooted in solidarity and peacebuilding. Using ethnographic methods supported by qualitative and quantitative data analysis, the research aims to provide an alternative, yet complimentary, approach to the more widespread state-focused analysis of the conflict.

    Dr. Sauders received his Ph.D. in Anthropology from American University in 2007.

    Courses: ANTH 348 Peasant Societies; Politics of Culture; History and Culture of the Middle East; Anthropology of Islam; Anthropology of Museums

    http://ewu.academia.edu/RobertSauders

    Julia Smith

    Professor
    Isle Hall 125
    Phone: 509.359.7958
    Fax: 509.359.7958
    Email: jsmith4@ewu.edu
    Curriculum Vitae

    Julia Smith received her MA (on interpreting household archaeology for the Classic Maya) and PhD (on small-scale coffee farmers in southern Costa Rica) from the University of Pittsburgh after receiving her bachelors degree in anthropology from Vanderbilt University. She’s done extensive fieldwork in Costa Rica and Mexico, with brief projects in Honduras and Nicaragua. Her recent work has focused on the restructuring of conventional and alternative coffee markets, especially the Fair Trade market. She’s particularly interested in how changing market opportunities and the social relations embedded within them affect the way that people think about coffee, about their relationship with consumers, and about the environment.

     

    Courses:  ANTH 401 Anthropological Research Methods; ANTH 357 Peoples of Latin America; ANTH 366; ANTH 366 Revolution and Development in the Third World; ANTH 455 Archaeology of Meso-America

     

    Fred S. Strange

    Professor
    Isle Hall 207
    Phone: 509.359.7926
    Fax: 509.359.7926
    Email: fred.strange@ewu.edu
    Curriculum Vitae

    Dr. Strange's academic trail has led him through Reed College, University of California at Berkeley, San Francisco State, and finally, the University of Pittsburgh. He is grateful to anthropology's tradition of fieldwork for having given him an excuse for playing out his childhood fantasies in the plow furrows, market places, tourist venues, and peasant villages of Mexico and Central America. In a restless and unresigned retirement, he reads fantastic tales to his grandchildren, and teaches courses that remind him how much he has to learn about social and cultural theory. When not pining to return to Mexico and Central America, he does community theatre, works with Thin Air Community Radio, and tries to alchemize his field notes into a dolorous and wistful poetry, feeling he is coming full circle to where he began.

    Courses: ANTH 444 Development of Anthropological Theory

    Michael L. Zukosky

    Professor
    Isle Hall 123
    Phone: 509.359.6229
    Email: mzukosky@ewu.edu

    Dr. Michael L. Zukosky received his Ph.D. from Temple University with a dissertation on grassland policy and politics in China's Altai Mountains. He has general interests in philosophical anthropology and social theory as well as their application to economic development and  conservation policy. He came to Eastern Washington University in 2006 and teaches courses in Asian studies, cultural and linguistic anthropology and the anthropology of science and technology.  These interests intersect in the study of the ontological and semiotic aspects of science and technology in development policy throughout the Central Eurasian region including Kazakhstan, Mongolia, and China.  He is currently finishing a book based on National Science Foundation-funded research about Przewalski horse reintroduction in northwest China and the pluralism of animals, knowledge, technologies, languages, values, and interests which constitute it. 

    Courses: ANTH 101 Cultural Anthropology; ANTH 445 Linguistic Anthropology; ANTH 446 Sociolinguistics;  ANTH 495 Anthropology of Science and Technology; ANTH 349 Major Civilizations of Asia

    http://www.academicroom.com/users/mzukosky

    Contact Information

    Department of Geography and Anthropology
    103 Isle Hall
    Cheney, WA 99004

    email: lknoles35@ewu.edu
    phone: 509.359.2433
    fax: 509.359.2474

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