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Philosophy Minor

Abstract

The philosophy program at Eastern offers a set of introductory courses that figure prominently in general education requirements, undergird the more advanced courses, and address some of the haunting why questions we carry with us from childhood when we were all philosophizing.

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    PHILOSOPHY MINOR (20 CREDITS)

    The Philosophy minor requires 20 credits with no more than 10 credits taken in 200-level courses.

    Course examples:

    210 CRITICAL THINKING - 5 cr Logic as a tool for the analysis of informal arguments. The course develops techniques for formalizing and testing arguments from everyday life. (Satisfies the GECR for Humanities and Fine Arts, List 3, Philosophy and Reasoning.) Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 101. Basic skills clearance in Mathematics.

    211 INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHY - 5 cr Some traditional problems about the nature of the world and human knowledge. Typical problems concern the existence of God, personal identity and free will, the relations of minds to bodies and of perception to the external world. (Satisfies the GECR for Humanities and Fine Arts, List 3, Philosophy and Reasoning.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENGL 101.

    212 INTRODUCTORY ETHICS - 5 cr An examination of the nature and content of morality. Two questions are central: Is morality based on knowledge or on emotion? Is there a rational motive to act morally? (Satisfies the GECR for Humanities and Fine Arts, List 3, Philosophy and Reasoning.) Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 101.

    What will I study?

    Student Learning Outcomes

    Students will:
    • critically analyze, using logic and other tools, the consistency and verifiability of their own beliefs and the beliefs of others, as well as engage in reasoned public deliberation challenging those beliefs;
    • understand the main doctrines and evaluate the arguments that underpin the ancient, modern, and contemporary periods of thought;
    • offer interpretations of the ideas of major philosophers by showing how they relate to perennial philosophical themes such as: visions of the good life, reality versus appearance, the roles of reason and experience, freedom and morality, etc;
    • apply methods for philosophical problem solving by (a) relating theory to practice, (b) evaluating ideas in terms of both generic or universal humanity and perspectival pluralism, and (c) applying normative standards of truth, value and beauty;
    • apply philosophical writing styles in writing assignments and research projects that are aimed at extending philosophical inquiry through argumentation and/or comparative studies.

    Interesting courses I might take:

    Contact Information

    Philosophy
    229 Patterson Hall
    Cheney, WA 99004

    email: ksadowski@ewu.edu
    phone: 509.359.7064

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