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Bachelor of Arts in Technical Communication

Abstract

Our English degrees provide students with strong writing skills, and a background in critical analysis, the structure of language, and literary history.

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    Eastern Washington University is excited to offer the only BA in Technical Communication in the State of Washington.

    Technical Communication is a professional program designed to prepare students for a career as a technical writer. Because of the diverse nature of the profession, students will need to develop a broad base of professional writing skills, including work in documentation, editing, graphic design and public relations.

    Technical communicators develop, edit and manage software and equipment manuals, maintenance procedures, assembly instructions, catalogs, sales promotion materials, organizational policies and procedures, websites, online tutorials and proposals.

    For current information about program requirements, please see current EWU catalog.

    What will I study?

    As part of this program, students will complete a professional internship, requiring at least 200 hours of supervised work in a business, industry or agency related to the student's academic preparation and career goals. Students will also develop basic computer literacy, including working knowledge in desktop publishing and web design practices.

    With a Technical Communication degree, students learn how to design user interfaces, test documents and products for usability and prepare text for translations.

    Technical communicators are writers, editors, artists, managers, educators and media specialists who are employed in virtually every industry.

    Also, technical communicators can serve as part of a team conducting usability studies to help improve the design of product prototypes. They plan and edit technical materials and oversee the preparation of illustrations, photographs, diagrams and charts.

    Today's world of technology means a high demand for individuals who can understand scientific and technical information and communicate that information to others.

    Technical Communication is a fascinating and lucrative career choice with the opportunity to:

    Note: two years of a single high school foreign language or one year of a single college-level foreign language is required.

    Course List

    Required Courses (45-55 credits)

    ENGL 205 Intro to Technical Communication (5)
    (Students must complete this course with a minimum grade of 3.0)
    ENGL 305 Professional Communication (5)
    ENGL 360 Language Structure and Use (5)
    ENGL 404 Software Documentation (5)
    ENGL 407 Proposal Writing (5)
    ENGL 409 Editing in Technical Communication (5)
    ENGL 459 Grammar for Teachers (5)
    ENGL 490 Senior Capstone: Issues in Technical Communication (5)
    ENGL 495 Professional/Technical Communication Internship (5-15)

    Supporting Courses (40 credits)

    CMST 200 Intro to Speech Communication (4)
    DESN 216 Computer Graphics (4)
    DESN 263 Visual Communication Design I (4)
    DESN 343 Typography (4)
    DESN 360 Publishing for Print and the World Wide Web (4)
    DESN 368 Web Design (4)
    JRNM 451 Introduction to Public Relations Theory (4)
    JRNM 452 Advanced Public Relations Theory (4)
    JRNM 453 Public Relations Writing (4)
    TECH 393 Technology in World Civilization (4)

    Electives - select one from the following (5 credits)

    CMST 340 Intercultural Communication (5)
    DSST 310 Disability, Culture and Society (5)
    ENGL/IDST 380 Survey of Native American Literatures (5)
    ENGL/WMST 389 Women, Literature and Social Change (5)

    Contact Information

    Department of English
    203 Patterson Hall
    Cheney, WA 99004

    email: Diana.Weber@ewu.edu
    phone: 509.359.6039
    fax: 509.359.4269

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